My RSS Feed
My Facebook
My Twitter
My YouTube
My Pinterest

SUBSCRIBE to this blog



My ARCADE GAMES & INFO
SOFTWARE I've Written
My PHOTO ALBUMS
My WRITING ADVICE
Every CAR I'VE OWNED
Every STATE I'VE VISITED



My Book, COMMODORK
My Book, INVADING SPACES



You Don't Know Flack (Tech)
Sprite Castle (Commodore/C64)
Multiple Sadness (Bad Movies)
Throwback Reviews (Movies)

More Podcast Details
Combined Feed: iTunes / RSS




Fun with RAID.

This post assumes you know and/or care about RAID5. If you don’t, skip today’s post.

A couple of years ago, I set up what was, at the time, a pretty large RAID5 container. I used four 1TB drives and, being on a budget, put them in their own tower, connected them to a cheap SATA card, and used Windows Server to turn them into a software RAID5. It gave me almost 3TB of usable space which nobody could ever, ever fill up, unless they were me.

Last week, one of the drives failed. I hit TigerDirect to order a spare, but after seeing how low the price of 2TB drives had dropped, I ordered 4 of those instead, along with a tiny little drive enclosure. The enclosure does hardware RAID 0/1/5/10, and supports USB, eSATA, and Firewire.

After backing up the contents of my original RAID5 partition — and really, just how AWESOME is it that we live in a world in which I happen to have 2.5TB of space just SITTING AROUND (seriously!) — I reset the failed drive and started it rebuilding. That turned out to be a 24 hour process that resulted in recovering a lot, but not all of, my files. Again, thank goodness for backups. All is safe.

Then I plugged in and configured the new hardware-based RAID5. Right now it’s connected via USB 2.0, and it’s slow. After another ~24 hours of formatting, I have spent the past 8 hours copying mp3s back over to it. Then will come the movies, the home directories, the digital pictures, and whatever else I have backed up. I am quickly seeing that USB may not be the way to go, and I don’t think the SATA card I originally installed has an eSATA port. I’ll check tonight and, if it doesn’t, I’ll be buying one tomorrow.

So anyway, here’s the takeaway: thank goodness for RAID5 and thank goodness for backups. Oh, and USB is slow when trying to move 3TB of crap around.

Similar Posts:

Comments are closed.